Can Skincare Improve Your Overall Health?

Woman face hydration orchid serum

According to researchers
 at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the San Francisco Veterans Administ­ration Health Care System (SFVA), moisturized skin might prevent age-related ailments including Alzheimer's, heart disease and diabetes.

The cosmetic and personal care industry hears it all the time: the skin is the body’s largest organ; and we focus on its holistic status to treat signs of aging, or address compromised conditions. But what we do not often consider is how its negative health could affect our overall health—being the largest organ. A new pilot study from dermatol­ogists at UCSF and the SFVA brings this perspective to light.

Inflammation, Aging and the Skin

According to the researches, as humans age, low levels of inflammation—or inflammaging—occur, driven by an increase in molecules in the blood known as cytokines. Such age-related inflammation has been linked to chronic diseases including Alzheimer’s, cardiova­scular disease and diabetes. And while scientists suspected the inflammation stemmed from the immune system or liver, this group of dermatol­ogists have a different theory.

“The inflammation must come from an organ big enough that very minor inflammation can affect the whole body," explained study senior author Mao-Qiang Man, M.D, a research scientist in the UCSF, based at the SFVA Health Care System, who is also a visiting professor at Southern Medical University in Guangzhou, China. "Skin is a good candidate for this because of its size.”

While ordinarily, cytokines help to repair defects in the barrier; but in aging skin, the barrier is not so easily repaired, and inflammatory signals continue to be released, eventually reaching the blood.

Man added that with aging, dermatol­ogical symptoms such as itchiness, dryness and changes in acidity arise. So while skin may have minor inflammation, due to its relative size to the body, this elevates circulating cytokine levels. Furthermore, skin starts to deteriorate at around the age of 50, with changes to epidermal pH, hydration and the permeability barrier; and a loss in moisture or breaks in the permeability barrier also can cause the skin to release inflammatory cytokines.

While ordinarily, cytokines help to repair defects in the barrier, in aging skin, the barrier is not so easily repaired, so the inflammatory signals continue to be released, eventually reaching the blood.

“Until recently, the scientific community didn’t believe that skin could contribute to systemic inflammation and disease," said study lead author Theodora Mauro, M.D, a professor of dermatology at UCSF and the SFVA Health Care System. "But in the last five years, studies of psoriasis and dermatitis have shown that skin inflammation from these diseases likely increases the risk of heart disease."

Topical Treatment

Based on these and other observations, the researchers published a study in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, whereby they attempted to reverse age-related skin damage using an over-the-counter skin cream formulated with cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides, which had previously been shown to contribute to skin repair.

Using the cream reportedly lowered participants’ cytokine levels to be nearly equivalent with people in their 30s.

Thirty-three older adults between the ages of 58 and 95 years applied the cream all over their bodies twice daily for 30 days. After one month, the researchers measured blood levels of three cytokines—interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha—all of which have been implicated in age-related inflammatory diseases.

Use of the cream reduced the amount of all three cytokines, compared with both the participants’ levels before application of the cream and the levels of similarly aged adults who did not use the cream. In fact, using the cream reportedly lowered participants’ cytokine levels to be nearly equivalent with people in their 30s.

“We're going to see whether using the cream to keep epidermal function normal as people age will prevent the development of those downstream diseases,” said co-author Peter Elias, M.D., a UCSF professor of dermatology based at the SFVA Health Care System. “If we do, the implication would be that after the age of 50, you would want to be applying an effective topical barrier repair preparation daily for the rest of your life.”

— Reprinted/excerpted from Cosmetics & Toiletries® Magazine

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All About Sytenol A in remarkable Revivinol Serum

Before After photos Sytenol A Bakichiol in Revivinol Serum

Sytenol® A - A Functional Analog of Retinol From the perspective of topically applied compositions, a small molecule without having the negatives of Retinol that safely mimics the properties of Retinol (Fisher et al., FASEB J,1002-1013, 1996) is a greatly sought after ingredient.

Volcanic plots illustrate the molecular signatures of Retinol and Sytenol® A of a DNA microarray experiment using reconstructed full thickness epidermis. This shows a very similar overall shape, indicating similar overall modulation of gene expressions in the skin substitute model. Multiple comparative studies revealed Sytenol® A to be the true alternative to Retinol (Chaudhuri, In Cosmeceuticals and Active Cosmetics, 3r Edition, Eds., Maibach et al., Chapter 1, 1-18, 2015) for anti-aging applications and does not have the inherent safety & stability issues of Retinol.

A recent randomized, double-blind clinical study between Sytenol® A and Retinol carried out by UC-Davis Dermatologists demonstrated that both compounds significantly decreased wrinkle surface area and hyperpigmentation, with no statistical difference between the compounds. The Retinol users reported more facial skin scaling, burning and stinging. Authors concluded that Sytenol® A is a more tolerable alternative to Retinol (Dhaliwal et al, British J Dermatology, 2018 Jun 27. doi: 10.1111/bjd.16918).

Clinically Proven to Reduce Multiple Signs of Aging

Protocol:
• Human volunteers – 17; 16 Completed; Age – 41 to 60 yrs; Caucasian (14), Hispanics (2)
• Study duration – 12 weeks
• Test sites – Full face
• Test substance – Lotion with 0.5% Sytenol® A; Contains No sunscreen and No moisturizer
• Application frequency – About 2 g twice a day
• Methodology – Expert grading/Self-assessment by panelists (Grading 0 to 4): (1) Roughness & Dryness; (2) Fine lines & wrinkles; (3) Skin tone; (4) Skin elasticity & firmness; (5) Radiance; (6) Brightening; (7) Overall eye-area appearance; Silicone Replica Analysis: Wrinkle depth & Skin roughness; Photography: Before & after the treatments; Readings were taken at baseline, 4, 8 & 12 weeks.

• Statistical Analysis – Statistical significance defined as p ≤0.05

Results

The results clearly showed that, after twelve weeks treatment, significant improvement in lines and wrinkles, pigmentation, elasticity, firmness and overall photo-damage was observed, with no irritating effect on skin. Based on these results and the comparative studies of Retinol and Sytenol® A done by Sytheon, we conclude that Sytenol® A is the first true Retinol-like anti-aging product (Chaudhuri & Bojanowski, Intern J Cosmet Sci, 36(3):221-230, 2014).


Get the remarkable benefits of Sytenol A in Revivinol "Unretinol" Serum here.

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RevivHair Max Stimulating Serum - now with Prohairin-Beta4

Man with thick hair, Reviv Serums logo


Announcing a RevivHair Max Stimulating Serum upgrade!

• Now with Prohairin-Beta4:

Studies show that Prohairin-ß4 (Octapeptide-2) acts as a stimulator of hair growth, at least in part by antagonizing the inhibitory effects of something called BMP4 on hair follicle development. It also targets the prevention of depigmentation in hair.

• Additional upgrades for RevivHair Max: new bottle safety seal; separate shrink-wrapped dropper applicator included; larger packaging; SAME LOW PRICE!

Get it today:

https://revivserums.com/revivhair

 

 

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Might anti-pollution mean anti-acne?

Best skincare products for acne and pollution

A new study published in Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology explores the connection between pollution and inflammatory acne.

The study revealed that acne symptoms can be connected with regions having high levels of air pollution.

The paper also reported that while the prevalence of acne is similar between Asian and Caucasian women, Asian women experience inflammatory acne more frequently and report flare-ups during high pollution periods.

Neurophroline, one of the remarkable primary ingredients in HA7X Multi-Molecular Hydrator Serum, has shown to target pollution, stress, and cortisol.

This new study reveals that such an ingredient might also be useful in combating the appearance of acne and acne symptoms.

Read more here:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5446966/

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Making Hair Loss History: Native Polyphenols to Kick-start Hair Regrowth

Treating alopecia with RevivHair Hair Stimulating Serum & Redensyl

A new study of the patented molecules in our Redensyl® ingredient confirm its remarkable role in hair stimulation and hairloss prevention. 

Redensyl is not the only ingredient that makes RevivHair Max Hair Stimulating Serum so remarkably effective — our novel growth factors, stem cells, and peptides combine to make it a powerhouse. But Redensyl is undoubtedly a big hero in our hero serum.

Excerpts from the study:

Results: Clinical Studies

It is well-known that the growth of scalp hair is a cyclical process, made up of successive phases of growth (anagen) and rest (telogen).11, 20 In a non-balding scalp, more than 90% of scalp hair is in an anagen phase.12

However, with AGA [Androgenic Alopecia], the progressive shortening of the anagen phase, as well as an increase in the duration of the lag phase (i.e., the interval between the shedding of a telogen hair and the emergence of a replacement anagen hair), across successive hair cycles, progressively decreases the percentage of hair follicles in the anagen phase. For men with male pattern hair loss, only 60% to 80% of total hairs are in anagen phase. This shortening of the anagen phase leads to progressive miniaturization of hair follicles, which contributes to a decrease of visible hair over affected areas of the scalp.13

In the present clinical study, the authors demonstrated that treatment with DEGZ [Redensyl] 3% for three months daily efficiently treats androgenetic alopecia by increasing the percentage of hair in the anagen phase (by about +9%) and decreasing the percentage of hair in telogen phase (by about -17%) (see Table 1). In this study, an insignificant placebo effect also was observed, likely due to the mechanical activation of microcirculation, with almost no more evolution after one month.

None of the results obtained with the placebo were statistically significant. However, 3% DEGZ increased the density ratio of hair in the anagen phase to hair in the telogen phase. After three months, the ratio reached 2.37 (+29%) while the placebo showed no evolution after one month (see Table 2). Furthermore, this hair density increase observed after three months of treatment was confirmed by the scalp’s macrophotography (see Figure 6).

At the end of the study, volunteers using the test DEGZ formula judged their hair as stronger and thicker (data not shown). These benefits are likely provided by the glycine and zinc in the test blend. Glycine is an essential component for the hair shaft structure that directly enters hair’s composition of keratin-associated protein.14 Zinc reinforces hair shaft structure and is essential for cystin incorporation into keratin.15

Conclusion

DHQG and EGCG2 are two glucosylated derivatives of native dihydroquercetin and epigallocatechin gallate. These two polyphenols were previously shown to have different properties for hair care.7, 16

The present studies demonstrate that when these two molecules are used alone or in combination, beneficial properties are observed; including HFDPc metabolism stimulation, ORSc proliferation, beta catenin activation and anti-apoptotic effects on ORSc. In combination with EGCG2, and glycine and zinc, DHQG also induced the growth of AGA hair follicle explants cultured in vitro according to the Philpott model. This study also confirmed the crucial role of EGCG2 in hair growth induction.

Clinical investigations described here show this blend can treat androgenic alopecia by re-launching hair growth pathways and visibly decreasing hair loss within three months by promoting the conversion of hair follicles into the anagen phase via the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and by limiting the apoptosis of ORSc. Finally, the efficiency of the test blend as an alopecia hair loss treatment was confirmed by a high user satisfaction rate (+71%) during the clinical investigation.

- See more at: http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/testing/efficacyclaims/Making-Hair-Loss-History-Native-Polyphenols-to-Kick-start-Hair-Regrowth-425945524.html

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