NIKI'S BUBBLE Product Review site on hair stimulating serum

Before and after photos RevivHair Stimulating Serum

Renowned beauty blogger evaluates RevivHair Stimulating Serum with Redensyl, Peptides, Growth Factors, and Stem Cells:

"After about three weeks, I started noticing where my hair was the thinnest, that it was starting to get fuzzy and the hair was starting to grow again. After the fourth week, there was a big difference in the fact that the "peach fuzz" regrowth turned into actual hair that is now covering those bald spots I had! I can now wear my hair up without embarrassment and I owe that all to RevivSerums! They have an amazing product that works! "

Read more here:

http://www.nikisbubble.com/beauty/revivhair-stimulating-serum-review-by-revivserums

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New studies affirm a great "skin pill": PUFAs

A new study by Hull York Medical School shows that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including omega n-3 and omega n-6, are micronutrients associated with improved skin health, and especially derivatives of PUFAs such as linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid.

Notably, these essential fatty acids (EFAs) cannot be synthesized by humans.

Derivatives of linoleic acid significant for human health include arachidonic acid and γ–linolenic acid (GLA). GLA can be found in evening primrose oil and borage oil. It reduces inflammation by reducing the synthesis of inflammatory mediators and by increasing the production of eicosanoids.

Studies involving the supplementation of GLA-rich oils demonstrated an impact on TEWL (Trans-Epidermal Water Loss) in people with dry skin and the elderly, as well as healthy volunteers.

Read more here.

Our friends at Swanson Vitamins have an inexpensive MultiOmega 3-6-9 that combines a synergistic balance of omega-3 and omega-6 EFAs:

https://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson-efas-multiomega-3-6-9-flax-borage-fish-1200-mg-220-sgels?otherSize=SWE020

Make sure you maintain great skin health both outside (with our remarkable serums) and inside (with great supplementation).

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Rub it in!

Are skincare topicals more effective when rubbed in?

There are new scientific studies that show it's probably best to rub or apply pressure when applying skin topicals: it can actually increase penetration.

Depending on the specific rubbing experiment, there was a two- to three-fold increase in product retained in full-thickness skin with rubbing than without.

"While these findings cannot be generalized to all skin care and cosmetic ingredients, they provide a basis and preliminary evidence suggesting that massage can be an important factor when treating skin. Its influence may be compounded by specific physiochemical properties of the chemical as well as the duration, pressure, and quantity of application. In the meantime, rubbing is just one of many variables influencing efficacy that await in-depth evaluation."

See more here:
http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/research/universitydata/Skin-Care-Gets-a-Good-Rub-Down-The-Role-Massage-Plays-in-Cosmetic-and-Skin-Care-382510341.html

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Scientists Find Mitochondrial Complex II Declines with Age

A new study has found the activity of mitochondrial complex II, which is a key metabolic enzyme found in human skin cells, declines as humans age.

These findings, as published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, help scientists at Newcastle University, UK, better understand human skin cells. With this knowledge, the researchers can create potential anti-aging treatments and cosmetic products specialized to work against the decline in the enzyme’s activity levels.

With these results, scientists can develop more treatments for age-related diseases, such as cancer, with the understanding of how other body organs age.

Reflections from the Study’s Leading Professor

The leaders of the study were Mark Birch-Machin, professor of molecular dermatology at Newcastle University and Amy Bowman, Ph.D., research associate at Newcastle University's Institute of Cellular Medicine, along with part of Birch-Machin’s research group. Birch-Machin shared his insights about the research.

"As our bodies age we see that the batteries in our cells run down, known as decreased bio-energy and harmful free radicals increase. This process is easily seen in our skin as increased fine lines, wrinkles and sagging appears.

"Our research means that we now have a specific biomarker, or a target, for developing and screening anti-aging treatments and cosmetic creams that may counter this decline in bio-energy.

"There is now a possibility of finding anti-aging treatments, which can be tailored to differently aged and differently pigmented skin, and with the additional possibility to address the aging process elsewhere in our bodies."

The Research
To determine if there was a difference in activity as age increases, the complex II activity was measured in 27 donors, aged 6 through 72.

Samples were taken from a sun-protected area of skin, and techniques were used to measure the activities of the key enzymes within mitochondria. The mitochondria are involved in producing the skin cell’s energy derived from the epidermis and dermis, or higher and lower levels of skin.

The complex II activity showed cells derived from the lower levels declined with age, per unit of mitochondria. The amount of enzyme protein decreased due to the decline, and the decrease was only examined in the cells that stopped reproducing.

Continuing Studies
Future studies will now have to complete the requirement in setting up techniques to monitor anti-aging approaches in human skin, while also completely understanding skin’s functional consequences and other tissues.

"Newcastle University is pioneering research into aging as it has long been thought that mitochondria play an important role in the aging process, however the exact role has remained unclear,” said Bowman. “Our work brings us one step closer to understanding how these vital cell structures may be contributing to human aging, with the hope of eventually specifically targeting areas of the mitochondria in an attempt to counteract the signs of aging."

A recent study on mice showed the activity of complex II is lower in the skin of naturally aged older mice, in comparison to the skin of younger mice.

- See more at: http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/research/biology/Scientists-Find-Mitochondrial-Complex-II-Declines-with-Age-373083051.html

Many of the primary ingredients in our serums target the support of mitochondria. Of special note is the NANO-LIPOBELLE™ DN CoQ10 ingredient in our TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum. Here's a study on the positive, supportive effects of this product on mitochondria: http://bit.ly/1LHc70j

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"Natural" or "Chemical Free" vs. "Synthetic": What's the diff?

All about natural vs synthetic in skincare and haircare

 

Many customers prefer to use products with natural ingredients only, and without harmful chemicals. But this is when it gets confusing: scientifically, the biological effect of a particular chemical is the same, whether it is synthesized in a lab or isolated from natural sources in a lab.

Beyond that, there is no direct correlation between the benefits & dangers of a chemical and whether it has been "manmade" or naturally found.

It is important to distinguish between a chemical that is "synthetic" but structurally identical to a natural one, and a synthetic one that is not found in nature.

The bottom line is that any ingredient needs to be proven safe and effective in its intended quantity by research.

To ease your mind, every ingredient we used is in that category! Naturally derived or structurally identical, and safe for use.

It's a bit amusing to hear marketing jargon like "chemical free" when it comes to cosmetic products. Of course, even water is a chemical! Even though this humorous video is about the food industry, it brings home the point about the use of the term in cosmetics & skincare too:


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