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All About Sytenol A in remarkable Revivinol Serum

Before After photos Sytenol A Bakichiol in Revivinol Serum

Sytenol® A - A Functional Analog of Retinol From the perspective of topically applied compositions, a small molecule without having the negatives of Retinol that safely mimics the properties of Retinol (Fisher et al., FASEB J,1002-1013, 1996) is a greatly sought after ingredient.

Volcanic plots illustrate the molecular signatures of Retinol and Sytenol® A of a DNA microarray experiment using reconstructed full thickness epidermis. This shows a very similar overall shape, indicating similar overall modulation of gene expressions in the skin substitute model. Multiple comparative studies revealed Sytenol® A to be the true alternative to Retinol (Chaudhuri, In Cosmeceuticals and Active Cosmetics, 3r Edition, Eds., Maibach et al., Chapter 1, 1-18, 2015) for anti-aging applications and does not have the inherent safety & stability issues of Retinol.

A recent randomized, double-blind clinical study between Sytenol® A and Retinol carried out by UC-Davis Dermatologists demonstrated that both compounds significantly decreased wrinkle surface area and hyperpigmentation, with no statistical difference between the compounds. The Retinol users reported more facial skin scaling, burning and stinging. Authors concluded that Sytenol® A is a more tolerable alternative to Retinol (Dhaliwal et al, British J Dermatology, 2018 Jun 27. doi: 10.1111/bjd.16918).

Clinically Proven to Reduce Multiple Signs of Aging

Protocol:
• Human volunteers – 17; 16 Completed; Age – 41 to 60 yrs; Caucasian (14), Hispanics (2)
• Study duration – 12 weeks
• Test sites – Full face
• Test substance – Lotion with 0.5% Sytenol® A; Contains No sunscreen and No moisturizer
• Application frequency – About 2 g twice a day
• Methodology – Expert grading/Self-assessment by panelists (Grading 0 to 4): (1) Roughness & Dryness; (2) Fine lines & wrinkles; (3) Skin tone; (4) Skin elasticity & firmness; (5) Radiance; (6) Brightening; (7) Overall eye-area appearance; Silicone Replica Analysis: Wrinkle depth & Skin roughness; Photography: Before & after the treatments; Readings were taken at baseline, 4, 8 & 12 weeks.

• Statistical Analysis – Statistical significance defined as p ≤0.05

Results

The results clearly showed that, after twelve weeks treatment, significant improvement in lines and wrinkles, pigmentation, elasticity, firmness and overall photo-damage was observed, with no irritating effect on skin. Based on these results and the comparative studies of Retinol and Sytenol® A done by Sytheon, we conclude that Sytenol® A is the first true Retinol-like anti-aging product (Chaudhuri & Bojanowski, Intern J Cosmet Sci, 36(3):221-230, 2014).


Get the remarkable benefits of Sytenol A in Revivinol "Unretinol" Serum here.

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All about blue light

Blue light

 

What’s all this about blue light?

Blue light is a part of the spectrum of visible light, and is a high-energy, shorter-wavelength light, not to be confused with UVA or UVB rays.

The main source of the blue light we're exposed to is the sun, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. However, we also get a significant dose from our screens — phones, tablets, computers - and indoor lighting.

Blue light isn't all bad: it plays a role in maintaining good health, as it regulates our body's circadian rhythm — our natural sleep-wake cycle, and elevates mood and helps memory and cognitive function.

But is blue light damaging your skin?

Indeed there is mounting evidence that blue light does contribute to photo-aging, including discoloration, inflammation, wrinkles, and skin laxity. Studies also suggest that exposure to blue light might stimulate the production of free radicals in skin, which can accelerate the appearance of aging.

What to do about it?

New remarkable Revivinol Serum includes the compound Lumicease Blue, which helps prepare the skin through an adaptive response to light and targets the defense against blue light, UV, and infra-red radiations from phones, tablets and computers, as well as pollutants in the air and other damaging environmental aggressors.

A decrease in appearance of brown spots by 11.7% as well as in the amount of UV spots by 14.1% was observed after 56 days of treatment using Lumicease. Wrinkle volume and average roughness also diminished 21.5% and 13.2% respectively.

Get protected from blue light with Revivinol Serum. Its product page is here.

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All about Fluidipure 8G in RevivScalp and RevivHair Stimulating Shampoo

Flaking and oiliness addressed with Fluidipure 8G

FluidiPure 8G is a biomimetic purifying active agent which offers complete protection for the body’s “cutaneous cocoon.” As a glycine and sugar “biovector,” FluidiPure 8G helps to limit the proliferation of microorganisms responsible for cutaneous disorders. Its biomimetic acidifying power helps attacked skin to regain its physiological acidic pH, ensuring its integrity.

When tested in vivo on hair, it reduces the appearance of dandruff, soothes the scalp and eliminates unpleasant odors after 5 and 10 shampoos (clinical study performed on 46 volunteers vs. placebo).

On skin, FluidiPure 8G participates in reducing unpleasant scalp odors while it helps preserves bacteria beneficial to the skin and restore the skin’s natural acidic pH mantle, also helping to reduce skin sensitivity.

FluidiPure 8G also reduces the effects of 5-alpha reductase by 18% compared to a control, helping to regulate sebum and the reduction of hair loss.

Get these remarkable benefits in both RevivScalp Rejuvenating Scalp Serum Masque and RevivHair Stimulating Shampoo.


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Why Giving Up Alcohol Could Transform Your Skin

How to reverse the effects of alcohol on skin health

In pursuit of perfect skin, we try countless serums and creams, book elaborate facials, and chug water religiously, yet there’s a beyond-simple fix that has been staring us in the face all this time: giving up (or significantly cutting back on) alcohol—which we’ve long known is no health elixir, but has a perhaps unexpected impact on our complexions, in particular.

“Alcohol is actually one of the worst, most aggressive compounds to destroy your skin,” says New York nutritionist Jairo Rodriguez, who counts designers and Vogue editors among his clients. “I always joke with my patients, ‘If you want to get older, go ahead and drink!’ ” Here, Rodriguez breaks down the exact effects alcohol can have on your skin and how, when you do indulge, to imbibe in the best possible way.

Dehydration Is the Issue . . .
“Drinking is classified as two drinks a day. There’s a huge amount of damage to the skin that occurs; alcohol affects any mucous membrane from the pancreas and liver to the skin. The first effect is dehydration, as it actually takes all the fluid out of the skin. If you look at a woman who has been drinking for 20 or 30 years, and a woman the same age who hasn’t at all, we see a massive difference in the skin—more wrinkles from that dehydration damage, which can make you look 10 years older.”

. . . Inflammation, Too
“Alcohol inflames the tissue, and systemic inflammation to the skin caused by alcohol creates a histamine reaction—that creates the redness, the flushing of the skin. At first you think, oh you’re a little red, not a big deal, but over a period of time—six months, a year, two years—if you continue drinking, it can become a prominent facial redness you can’t get away from.”


You Can Bounce Back—Within Reason

“If you do give it up, the good thing is that your skin, like any other organ, has the ability to regenerate. The body has a fabulous rate of rehydration. But that regeneration depends on how much damage has been done. If you’ve been drinking for 15 to 20 years and stop, I think it’s great, but can you regenerate your skin back to [that of] a normal 50-year-old? Once you destroy the collagen, it is hard to get back.”


Choose Your Liquor Wisely

“People are going to drink, whether you like it or not, so what is the best alcohol to drink? Different alcohols have different effects on the skin, but as a general rule, the clearer, the better: Vodka, gin, and tequila get out of your system quicker. If you’re going to drink anything, in my opinion, drink vodka that doesn’t have a grain in it, like a potato vodka. It’s a lot clearer and smoother, so it gets in and out of your body, no problem.”


Drink Every Other Day—Or Less

“So, when you’re 20 years old and drink, that drink leaves your body in about three hours. When you’re 40 years old, it takes an average of 33 hours. If your transit time is three hours, that means you can drink on Monday and by Tuesday, it’s out of your body. If you’re 40 and you drink on Monday, don’t drink until Wednesday. Minimize to once or twice a week—the lower the intake, the lower the damage to your skin.”


Stay Hydrated

“If you’re going to drink, drink water with it to increase that diuretic effect. I think mothers have been saying that for the last 2,000 years, but nobody listens if your mother says it.”

[Of course, we'd also highly recommend our remarkable TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum with triple telomere targeters as part of the arsenal against alcohol's effect on skin. See its product page here.]

— Excerpted / reprinted from VOGUE: vogue.com/article/alcohol-skin-damage-effects

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