Making Hair Loss History: Native Polyphenols to Kick-start Hair Regrowth

Treating alopecia with RevivHair Hair Stimulating Serum & Redensyl

A new study of the patented molecules in our Redensyl® ingredient confirm its remarkable role in hair stimulation and hairloss prevention. 

Redensyl is not the only ingredient that makes RevivHair Max Hair Stimulating Serum so remarkably effective — our novel growth factors, stem cells, and peptides combine to make it a powerhouse. But Redensyl is undoubtedly a big hero in our hero serum.

Excerpts from the study:

Results: Clinical Studies

It is well-known that the growth of scalp hair is a cyclical process, made up of successive phases of growth (anagen) and rest (telogen).11, 20 In a non-balding scalp, more than 90% of scalp hair is in an anagen phase.12

However, with AGA [Androgenic Alopecia], the progressive shortening of the anagen phase, as well as an increase in the duration of the lag phase (i.e., the interval between the shedding of a telogen hair and the emergence of a replacement anagen hair), across successive hair cycles, progressively decreases the percentage of hair follicles in the anagen phase. For men with male pattern hair loss, only 60% to 80% of total hairs are in anagen phase. This shortening of the anagen phase leads to progressive miniaturization of hair follicles, which contributes to a decrease of visible hair over affected areas of the scalp.13

In the present clinical study, the authors demonstrated that treatment with DEGZ [Redensyl] 3% for three months daily efficiently treats androgenetic alopecia by increasing the percentage of hair in the anagen phase (by about +9%) and decreasing the percentage of hair in telogen phase (by about -17%) (see Table 1). In this study, an insignificant placebo effect also was observed, likely due to the mechanical activation of microcirculation, with almost no more evolution after one month.

None of the results obtained with the placebo were statistically significant. However, 3% DEGZ increased the density ratio of hair in the anagen phase to hair in the telogen phase. After three months, the ratio reached 2.37 (+29%) while the placebo showed no evolution after one month (see Table 2). Furthermore, this hair density increase observed after three months of treatment was confirmed by the scalp’s macrophotography (see Figure 6).

At the end of the study, volunteers using the test DEGZ formula judged their hair as stronger and thicker (data not shown). These benefits are likely provided by the glycine and zinc in the test blend. Glycine is an essential component for the hair shaft structure that directly enters hair’s composition of keratin-associated protein.14 Zinc reinforces hair shaft structure and is essential for cystin incorporation into keratin.15

Conclusion

DHQG and EGCG2 are two glucosylated derivatives of native dihydroquercetin and epigallocatechin gallate. These two polyphenols were previously shown to have different properties for hair care.7, 16

The present studies demonstrate that when these two molecules are used alone or in combination, beneficial properties are observed; including HFDPc metabolism stimulation, ORSc proliferation, beta catenin activation and anti-apoptotic effects on ORSc. In combination with EGCG2, and glycine and zinc, DHQG also induced the growth of AGA hair follicle explants cultured in vitro according to the Philpott model. This study also confirmed the crucial role of EGCG2 in hair growth induction.

Clinical investigations described here show this blend can treat androgenic alopecia by re-launching hair growth pathways and visibly decreasing hair loss within three months by promoting the conversion of hair follicles into the anagen phase via the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and by limiting the apoptosis of ORSc. Finally, the efficiency of the test blend as an alopecia hair loss treatment was confirmed by a high user satisfaction rate (+71%) during the clinical investigation.

- See more at: http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/testing/efficacyclaims/Making-Hair-Loss-History-Native-Polyphenols-to-Kick-start-Hair-Regrowth-425945524.html

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Prominent Canadian beauty review site evaluates hairloss topical

Best serum for hair fall

Renowned beauty blog Reflections of Sanity

Beauty review site Reflections of Sanity on RevivHair Hair Stimulating Serum with Redensyl, Growth Factors, Peptides, and Stem Cells:

I didn't notice any major hair growth as I personally think I would need more product and time to actually notice that. I did however notice my hair loss has lessened a whole freaking lot! Before using this product, I would lose 30-50 strands of hair each time I washed it (yes, I actually counted) but after more than a week of adding this serum into my hair routine, I lost at most 10-15 strands each wash. The difference is remarkable!

Read more here.


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NIKI'S BUBBLE Product Review site on hair stimulating serum

Before and after photos RevivHair Stimulating Serum

Renowned beauty blogger evaluates RevivHair Stimulating Serum with Redensyl, Peptides, Growth Factors, and Stem Cells:

"After about three weeks, I started noticing where my hair was the thinnest, that it was starting to get fuzzy and the hair was starting to grow again. After the fourth week, there was a big difference in the fact that the "peach fuzz" regrowth turned into actual hair that is now covering those bald spots I had! I can now wear my hair up without embarrassment and I owe that all to RevivSerums! They have an amazing product that works! "

Read more here:

http://www.nikisbubble.com/beauty/revivhair-stimulating-serum-review-by-revivserums

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Beauty Review Site "My Product Reviews" on RevivHair Hair Stimulating Serum

Beauty blogger reviews RevivHair Hair Stimulating Serum

After using the serum for 3 weeks I am extremely impressed. Initially I had more hair loss for couple of days but that was mostly for serum effect to start working. After week of usage I could visibly see less hair falling during hair wash or while combing. After 3 weeks I am so happy with this product, I cannot believe that I actually have just few hair stands while washing and well almost none while combing. For me controlling my rapid hair fall was very important as with thin hair texture my hair looks really limp.

Read more:

http://myreviewsnsblog.blogspot.com/2015/11/revivhair-stimulating-serum-with.html

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Hair Loss and Hair Shedding: An Overview

Best topical products for hairfall and alopecia

Do you have hair loss or hair shedding?

If you’ve been noticing more hairs on your pillow or hairbrush than normal, you may worry that you have hair loss. You could actually just be shedding more hairs than normal. Yes, there is a difference.

Hair shedding often stops on its own

It’s normal to shed between 50 and 100 hairs a day. When the body sheds significantly more hairs every day, a person has excessive hair shedding. The medical term for this condition is telogen effluvium.

Excessive hair shedding is common in people who have experienced one the following stressors:

  • Lost 20 pounds or more
  • Given birth
  • Experiencing lots of stress (Caring for a loved one who is sick, going through a divorce, losing a job)
  • Had high fever
  • Undergone an operation
  • Recovering from an illness, especially if had a high fever
  • Stopped taking birth-control pills

Most people notice the excessive hair shedding a few months after the stressful event. For example, a new mom can see excessive hair shedding about two months after giving birth. The shedding usually peaks about four months after giving birth. This shedding is normal — and temporary.

As your body readjusts, the excessive shedding stops. Within 6 to 9 months, the hair tends to regains its normal fullness.

If the stressor stays with you, however, hair shedding can be long lived. People who are constantly under a lot of stress can have long-term excessive hair shedding.

Hair loss differs from hair shedding

Hair loss occurs when something stops the hair from growing. The medical term for this condition is anagen effluvium. The most common causes of hair loss include:

  • Hereditary hair loss
  • Immune system overreacts
  • Some drugs and treatments
  • Hairstyles that pull on the hair
  • Harsh hair care products
  • Compulsion to pull out one’s hair

If you have hair loss, your hair will not grow until the cause stops. For example, people who undergo chemotherapy or radiation treatments often lose a lot of hair. When the treatment stops, their hair tends to regrow.

If you suspect that a treatment or drug is causing your hair loss, talk with your doctor. …

Other causes of hair loss may require treatment. Many people who have hereditary hair loss continue to lose hair without treatment. A woman who inherits the genes for hereditary hair loss may notice gradual thinning. Men who have hereditary hair loss tend to develop a receding hairline or bald patch that begins in the center of the scalp.

Treatment helps many people who have hair loss, but not everyone. A dermatologist can tell you what to expect.

Dermatologist can distinguish between hair loss and hair shedding

If you are concerned by the amount of hair falling out, you don’t need to suffer in silence. You can turn to a dermatologist for help. These doctors specialize in diagnosing and treating the skin, hair, and nails. A dermatologist can tell you whether you have hair loss or excessive hair shedding. Some people have both.

A dermatologist also can find the cause or causes and tell you what you can expect. Effective treatments options are available for many types of hair loss. The sooner treatment begins, the better the prognosis.

Tips dermatologists give their patients

[We work with many, many dermatologists and trichologists who recommend our hair stimulating serums for their patients and clients. Check out the entire range here. ]


Related resources

Alopecia areata
Developing in otherwise healthy people, this disease that can cause round bald patches on the scalp, diffuse hair loss, or in rare cases, complete hair loss.

Five tips to help manage stress
Research-proven tips to help you manage short- and long-term stress.

References

Cheng AS, Bayliss SJ, “The genetics of hair shaft disorders.” J Am Acad Dermatol 2008;59(1):1-22.

- See more at: https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/hair-care/hair-loss-vs-hair-shedding


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