Why Giving Up Alcohol Could Transform Your Skin

How to reverse the effects of alcohol on skin health

In pursuit of perfect skin, we try countless serums and creams, book elaborate facials, and chug water religiously, yet there’s a beyond-simple fix that has been staring us in the face all this time: giving up (or significantly cutting back on) alcohol—which we’ve long known is no health elixir, but has a perhaps unexpected impact on our complexions, in particular.

“Alcohol is actually one of the worst, most aggressive compounds to destroy your skin,” says New York nutritionist Jairo Rodriguez, who counts designers and Vogue editors among his clients. “I always joke with my patients, ‘If you want to get older, go ahead and drink!’ ” Here, Rodriguez breaks down the exact effects alcohol can have on your skin and how, when you do indulge, to imbibe in the best possible way.

Dehydration Is the Issue . . .
“Drinking is classified as two drinks a day. There’s a huge amount of damage to the skin that occurs; alcohol affects any mucous membrane from the pancreas and liver to the skin. The first effect is dehydration, as it actually takes all the fluid out of the skin. If you look at a woman who has been drinking for 20 or 30 years, and a woman the same age who hasn’t at all, we see a massive difference in the skin—more wrinkles from that dehydration damage, which can make you look 10 years older.”

. . . Inflammation, Too
“Alcohol inflames the tissue, and systemic inflammation to the skin caused by alcohol creates a histamine reaction—that creates the redness, the flushing of the skin. At first you think, oh you’re a little red, not a big deal, but over a period of time—six months, a year, two years—if you continue drinking, it can become a prominent facial redness you can’t get away from.”


You Can Bounce Back—Within Reason

“If you do give it up, the good thing is that your skin, like any other organ, has the ability to regenerate. The body has a fabulous rate of rehydration. But that regeneration depends on how much damage has been done. If you’ve been drinking for 15 to 20 years and stop, I think it’s great, but can you regenerate your skin back to [that of] a normal 50-year-old? Once you destroy the collagen, it is hard to get back.”


Choose Your Liquor Wisely

“People are going to drink, whether you like it or not, so what is the best alcohol to drink? Different alcohols have different effects on the skin, but as a general rule, the clearer, the better: Vodka, gin, and tequila get out of your system quicker. If you’re going to drink anything, in my opinion, drink vodka that doesn’t have a grain in it, like a potato vodka. It’s a lot clearer and smoother, so it gets in and out of your body, no problem.”


Drink Every Other Day—Or Less

“So, when you’re 20 years old and drink, that drink leaves your body in about three hours. When you’re 40 years old, it takes an average of 33 hours. If your transit time is three hours, that means you can drink on Monday and by Tuesday, it’s out of your body. If you’re 40 and you drink on Monday, don’t drink until Wednesday. Minimize to once or twice a week—the lower the intake, the lower the damage to your skin.”


Stay Hydrated

“If you’re going to drink, drink water with it to increase that diuretic effect. I think mothers have been saying that for the last 2,000 years, but nobody listens if your mother says it.”

[Of course, we'd also highly recommend our remarkable TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum with triple telomere targeters as part of the arsenal against alcohol's effect on skin. See its product page here.]

— Excerpted / reprinted from VOGUE: vogue.com/article/alcohol-skin-damage-effects

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Head-to-Head Comparison: HA7X Multi-Molecular Hydrator Serum vs. SkinMedica® HA5 Rejuvenating Hydrator

HA7X Hydrator bests HA5 | 29 of the same ingredients + Neurophroline | Half the price

HA7X is the first direct competitor to award-winning HA5 Rejuvenating Hydrator by SkinMedica®, a component of Allergan, Inc.

HA7X includes 29 of the same primary ingredients in HA5, including Vitis Flower Stem Cell Extract, Peptide Complexes, and Sea Polysaccharides from French Polynesia.

But we didn't stop there: HA7X includes two additional, cutting-edge hyaluronic technologies (for a total of seven); HA5 only contains five.

HA7X is also the first U.S. product to contain benefits of Gold award-winning Neurophroline™ targeting stress, pollution, and cortisol.

Yet with these new actives, HA7X is about half the price as SkinMedica’s version.

HA7X works for all skin types, and is the perfect complement to any skincare regimen to prevent and combat the signs of aging.

Find out more on its product page here.

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Beauty & Style blog "That's So Crystal" reviews TelomErase Serum

Highest rated skincare serum for sagging skin

"I don't quite know which of the 10 key ingredients it is that does the job, but whatever it is- it just works. Over the past month I have most definitely noticed a tightening and lifting of my skin that can't be put down to any of the other skincare products that I am using at the moment. My pores have also shrunk noticeably since using this product on a daily basis. My makeup application has also been much improved due to the refined texture and plumpness of my skin. I have also found that when moisturizing after use of the serum, my dry skin seems to absorb my moisturizer better. Again, I don't know why it works and for the sake of being painfully honest, I don't really care. All I care about is that when I stand in front of the mirror and am ready to put on my makeup, I'm actually pleased at what I see staring back at me."

— Beauty and Style Blog "That's So Crystal" on TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum with Triple Telomere Targeters.

Read more here.




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Ultimate Serum review on Arianna's NYMPHASHION site

Ultimate Serum, compares to TNS Essential Serum

Beauty, fashion, and shopping site NYMPHASHION reviews stellar Ultimate Serum:

"…I can honestly tell it’s one of the most effective anti-age serums I’ve tried in the last year."

Ultimate Serum with Stem Cells, Growth Factors, and Peptides compares to TNS Essential Serum by SkinMedica®. Ultimate Serum contains 23 of the same ingredients in TNS, and also includes hexapeptides. It's also twice the size, and about half the price!

Read more here:

http://nymphashion.com/beauty-review-revivserums-ultimate-serum/

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Enzymology: All About Enzymes in Cosmeceuticals

Enzymes in our serums



A number of our serums utilize the remarkable properties of enzymes. Components like Superoxide Dismutase, CoQ10, and Catalase provide great benefits to skin, scalp & hair.

Here are just some of our products with phenomenal enzyme components:

TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum
RevivHair Stimulating Shampoo
RevivLash Lash & Brow Stimulating Serum



All about Enzymes

The purpose of enzymes in a cell is to increase the rate at which reactions occur, to allow the cell to build things or take them apart very quickly. This is because at the temperature and pH level of most cells, chemical reactions such as for cell growth and reproduction do not proceed fast enough to maintain cell viability. Enzymes accelerate the rates of reactions by more than a million-fold, so reactions that would take years can occur in fractions of seconds with the appropriate enzyme.

An enzyme is formed by stringing together 100 to 1,000 amino acids in a specific order. The chain of amino acids then folds into a unique shape. This shape is what allows the enzyme to carry out specific reactions. Enzymes work by a shape recognition; the substrate must form a complex with the enzyme so they can lock together to transfer energy and form a reaction. This reaction is what binds the substrate to the enzyme’s reactive site.
...
Enzymology in Cosmetics

The cosmetics industry has been using enzymes such as pumpkin for resurfacing and smoothing skin for many years. Enzymes have also proven useful to treat skin conditions related to skin aging, acne, congestion and pigmentation. Their most common benefits, described in detail below, include free radical scavenging, protein breakdown, structural reinforcement, antibacterial benefits and exfoliation.

While the benefits of enzymes have long been known, interest in enzymology for cosmetic and dermatology applications has more recently grown. This is due in part to advances in optimizing their functionality, safety and stability in cosmetic systems to provide skin and product protection—not to mention their natural and renewable status.

Indeed, coenzymes and cofactors in cosmetics, such as the well-known coenzyme Q10, represent a safe way to promote the efficient functioning of skin’s enzymes. Coenzymes and cofactors generally have low molecular weights, enabling them to penetrate through the stratum corneum to help activate the enzymes that are present. They also are stable and relatively easy to formulate into cosmetics.

Free Radical Scavenging

One area where topical enzymes have shown significant benefits is in skin protection. Enzymes capture free radicals, preventing damage to the skin caused by environmental pollution, bacteria, smoke, sunlight and other harmful factors. In this capacity, enzymes work successfully on the surface of skin, without the need to penetrate deeper to reach living cells.

Perhaps one of the most ubiquitous protective enzymes is superoxide dismutase (SOD). This enzyme, often extracted from yeast, is found in almost all living organisms and works to protect the cells from free radicals in aqueous environments. It also is found in barley grass, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, wheatgrass and most green plants.

SOD, in combination with catalase, is responsible for protecting skin proteins from aging due to oxidation. It works by dismutation, a process by which a highly reactive oxygen free radical is converted to a less reactive form. This is important to aerobic cells. If the oxygen molecule is not completely reduced to two water molecules (by accepting four electrons), the partially reduced superoxide radical will remain and can cause damage to skin.

SOD is used in cosmetics and personal care products as an anti-aging ingredient and antioxidant. It has been shown to prevent wrinkles, fine lines, age spots, help with wound healing, soften scar tissue, protect against UV rays and reduce other signs of aging.

— Excerpted from Cosmetics & Toiletries:
http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/formulating/category/skincare/Enzymology-Accelerating-Success-in-the-Skin-Care-Market-417062653.html


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