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You probably have canities! No, it's not an STD or dental problem.

Guys checking their hair pre-party

Canities is the fancy word for premature greying of the hair, and most people have some amount of greying, from very sparse, to fairly widespread.

The color, density, and styling of hair have a colossal bearing on one’s self-esteem, especially in today’s times where a person’s first impression may turn out to his or her last impression. However, increased longevity of human life means that we spend an increasing proportion of our lives sporting signs of aging on our scalp. The most dramatic age-related change in hair is the onset of hair graying or canities, which is the gradual age-dependent dilution of hair color to gray or white, also known assenile canities (canities (L.), canus, hoary, gray). The graying of hair occurs due to an admixture of normally pigmented, hypomelanotic, and amelanotic melanosomes. White hair is the endpoint of graying. The age of onset of senile canities appears to be genetically controlled and inheritable. The average age for Caucasians is mid-30s; for Asians, late-30s; and for Africans, mid-40s. A good rule of thumb is that by 50 years of age, 50% of people have 50% gray hair. [1]

The darker the hair color, the more noticeable early graying will be. Particular hair colors are associated with some ethnic groups. The Fischer–Saller scale, named after Eugen Fischer and Karl Saller, is used to determine the shades of hair color [Table 2]. [2] Majority of the human population (80–90%) fall into the U to Y category (dark brown/black hair) of this scale.

WHAT HAPPENS DURING PHYSIOLOGICAL AGING (CANITIES)?

The type of hair fiber keeps on changing with age. Neonates... have unpigmented lanugo hair while adults have short (mostly pigmented) vellus hair or fine pigmented intermediate hair and long terminal hair shafts. Similarly, surface morphology also shows variation with age, particularly with the reduction in the cuticular scale size. The synthetic capacity of hair bulb melanocytes is maximum during youth. An average scalp hair follicle usually receives 7 ± 15 melanocyte replacements from an outer root sheath reservoir to the hair bulb, which occurs in the first 45 years preceding the onset of gray hair.[4]  Different theories have been suggested for the age-related gradual loss of pigmentation. This includes exhaustion of enzymes involved in melanogenesis, impaired deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, loss of telomerase, loss of antioxidant mechanisms, and anti-apoptotic signals. Table 3 shows various changes that take place in a white hair bulb during canities.[5] The net result is that fewer melanosomes are incorporated into cortical keratinocytes of the hair shaft. Cessation of pigment production by melanocytes in the hair matrix area surrounding the dermal papilla is a slow process resulting in slow outgrowth of graying hair at the pace of normal hair growth. All hair bulbs do not decrease pigment incorporation in the growing hair at the same time giving “salt and pepper pattern”to the scalp hair.

It has been observed that hair graying pattern depends on gender, age of onset, and smoking habits, with smokers having higher chances of having canities.[6] Temporal area is involved in males first while in females, it is the frontal area. Age of onset also affects the area of involvement; parietal and occipital areas are involved in patients of young age while frontal area is involved in late onset group.[6]

WHY DOES PREMATURE CANITIES OCCUR?

Premature canities is a common cause of referral to dermatologists. It occurs most commonly without any underlying pathology, but is said to be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. It is different from poliosis which is circumscribed hypomelanosis of hair. The diseases associated with poliosis are given in Table 4. The pathogenesis of premature canities has not yet been clearly elucidated.[7] A hypothesis that pH and cysteine level of melanosomes play critical roles in determining the course of mixed melanosomes leading to dark, light, or red hair phenotype has been proposed because of the diversity of human hair pigmentation.[8] The role of pH in controlling mixed melanogenesis has attracted much attention as it is seen that tyrosinase activity is progressively suspended by lowering the pH, with a shift to more pheomelanin phenotype.[8-11] Concentration of cysteine in melanosomesis another control point in mixed melanogenesis.[7] Chemical hair straightening is done by alkaline disruption of the disulphide bonds in the cortex of the hair shaft. It causes considerable damage to the hair because of the pH (9–12) of the chemicals leaving the hair dry and fragile. In a questionnaire-based study, Shetty et al. reported that 22% of the cases experienced graying of hair also.[8,12] There is definitely a role of trace metal ions in hair pigmentation. Copper ions are required by tyrosinase at its active center; thus, it is likely that copper ions in melanocytes are necessary to maintain normal color.[7] Fatemi Naieni et al. compared the mean copper concentration in patients with PHG and controls and found lower mean serum copper concentration in the cases.
...
Data suggest that oxidative stress can also play a major role in the premature aging of skin and hair.[5] This theory has been widely accepted these days. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) or free radicals, generated by a variety of internal and environmental factors may result in direct damage to various cellular structural membranes, lipids, proteins, and DNA. To combat these free radicals, our body has endogenous defense mechanisms such as antioxidative enzymes which include superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase as well as non-enzymatic antioxidative molecules like vitamin E, vitamin C, glutathione, and ubiquinone. The production of these endogenous defense mechanisms decreases while that of free radical increases, resulting in aging.[5]

APPROACH TO MANAGEMENT OF PREMATURE CANITIES

...Recent experimental work indicates that cinnamidopropyltrimonium chloride, a quaternized UV absorber, delivered from a shampoo system, is suitable for photo protection of hair, while simultaneously providing an additional conditional benefit on hair,[23] Solid lipid nanoparticles have been developed as novel carriers of UV blockers for use on skin and hair, offering photoprotection on their own too by reacting and scattering ultraviolet radiation (UVR).[ 24]

Recent advances in the management of aging hair and scalp are anti-aging compounds. Shampoos are largely ineffective as anti-aging agents due to water dilution and short contact time, and antioxidants such as vitamin C and E in these preparations protect fatty substances in the shampoo from oxidation, and not the hair.

— Portions excerpted from Sehrawat M, Sinha S, Meena N, Sharma PK. Biology of hair pigmentation and its role in premature canities. Pigment Int 2017;4:7-12.
tinyurl.com/y59sopwa

HERE'S A NEW SOLUTION TO PREMATURE CANITIES

New RevivHair REV with Grey Hair Reverse and Hair Stimulation is a novel leave-in serum that targets greying hair three different ways, all without the use of colorants and dyes.

It's one of the first products to combine award-winning new ingredients Greyverse and Darnkenyl to address both the appearance of grey and thinning hair:

https://revivserums.com/products/revivhair-rev-with-grey-hair-reverse



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Can Skincare Improve Your Overall Health?

Woman face hydration orchid serum

According to researchers
 at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the San Francisco Veterans Administ­ration Health Care System (SFVA), moisturized skin might prevent age-related ailments including Alzheimer's, heart disease and diabetes.

The cosmetic and personal care industry hears it all the time: the skin is the body’s largest organ; and we focus on its holistic status to treat signs of aging, or address compromised conditions. But what we do not often consider is how its negative health could affect our overall health—being the largest organ. A new pilot study from dermatol­ogists at UCSF and the SFVA brings this perspective to light.

Inflammation, Aging and the Skin

According to the researches, as humans age, low levels of inflammation—or inflammaging—occur, driven by an increase in molecules in the blood known as cytokines. Such age-related inflammation has been linked to chronic diseases including Alzheimer’s, cardiova­scular disease and diabetes. And while scientists suspected the inflammation stemmed from the immune system or liver, this group of dermatol­ogists have a different theory.

“The inflammation must come from an organ big enough that very minor inflammation can affect the whole body," explained study senior author Mao-Qiang Man, M.D, a research scientist in the UCSF, based at the SFVA Health Care System, who is also a visiting professor at Southern Medical University in Guangzhou, China. "Skin is a good candidate for this because of its size.”

While ordinarily, cytokines help to repair defects in the barrier; but in aging skin, the barrier is not so easily repaired, and inflammatory signals continue to be released, eventually reaching the blood.

Man added that with aging, dermatol­ogical symptoms such as itchiness, dryness and changes in acidity arise. So while skin may have minor inflammation, due to its relative size to the body, this elevates circulating cytokine levels. Furthermore, skin starts to deteriorate at around the age of 50, with changes to epidermal pH, hydration and the permeability barrier; and a loss in moisture or breaks in the permeability barrier also can cause the skin to release inflammatory cytokines.

While ordinarily, cytokines help to repair defects in the barrier, in aging skin, the barrier is not so easily repaired, so the inflammatory signals continue to be released, eventually reaching the blood.

“Until recently, the scientific community didn’t believe that skin could contribute to systemic inflammation and disease," said study lead author Theodora Mauro, M.D, a professor of dermatology at UCSF and the SFVA Health Care System. "But in the last five years, studies of psoriasis and dermatitis have shown that skin inflammation from these diseases likely increases the risk of heart disease."

Topical Treatment

Based on these and other observations, the researchers published a study in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, whereby they attempted to reverse age-related skin damage using an over-the-counter skin cream formulated with cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides, which had previously been shown to contribute to skin repair.

Using the cream reportedly lowered participants’ cytokine levels to be nearly equivalent with people in their 30s.

Thirty-three older adults between the ages of 58 and 95 years applied the cream all over their bodies twice daily for 30 days. After one month, the researchers measured blood levels of three cytokines—interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha—all of which have been implicated in age-related inflammatory diseases.

Use of the cream reduced the amount of all three cytokines, compared with both the participants’ levels before application of the cream and the levels of similarly aged adults who did not use the cream. In fact, using the cream reportedly lowered participants’ cytokine levels to be nearly equivalent with people in their 30s.

“We're going to see whether using the cream to keep epidermal function normal as people age will prevent the development of those downstream diseases,” said co-author Peter Elias, M.D., a UCSF professor of dermatology based at the SFVA Health Care System. “If we do, the implication would be that after the age of 50, you would want to be applying an effective topical barrier repair preparation daily for the rest of your life.”

— Reprinted/excerpted from Cosmetics & Toiletries® Magazine

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All about blue light

Blue light

 

What’s all this about blue light?

Blue light is a part of the spectrum of visible light, and is a high-energy, shorter-wavelength light, not to be confused with UVA or UVB rays.

The main source of the blue light we're exposed to is the sun, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. However, we also get a significant dose from our screens — phones, tablets, computers - and indoor lighting.

Blue light isn't all bad: it plays a role in maintaining good health, as it regulates our body's circadian rhythm — our natural sleep-wake cycle, and elevates mood and helps memory and cognitive function.

But is blue light damaging your skin?

Indeed there is mounting evidence that blue light does contribute to photo-aging, including discoloration, inflammation, wrinkles, and skin laxity. Studies also suggest that exposure to blue light might stimulate the production of free radicals in skin, which can accelerate the appearance of aging.

What to do about it?

New remarkable Revivinol Serum includes the compound Lumicease Blue, which helps prepare the skin through an adaptive response to light and targets the defense against blue light, UV, and infra-red radiations from phones, tablets and computers, as well as pollutants in the air and other damaging environmental aggressors.

A decrease in appearance of brown spots by 11.7% as well as in the amount of UV spots by 14.1% was observed after 56 days of treatment using Lumicease. Wrinkle volume and average roughness also diminished 21.5% and 13.2% respectively.

Get protected from blue light with Revivinol Serum. Its product page is here.

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Protect your skin from polluted air

UV exposure isn't the only cause of premature skin aging. Pollution contributes. Here's how to thwart that.


Pollution, ozone, dirt and chemicals from vehicle emissions, plants, factories, cigarette smoke, etc., are seen by consumers as the second largest cause of skin, scalp and hair problems across the globe; the first is lack of sleep.*

HA7X Multi-Molecular Hydrator Serum is the first U.S. skincare product to contain award-winning Neurophroline®, the "neuro-soothing, anti-stress, feel-good, anti-pollution" active derived from the Terephrosia Purpurea plant, Gold winner of the In-Cosmetics Innovation Zone.

Gold Award for best skincare ingredient


Clinical efficacy on volunteers with stressed skin (polluted air):

The clinical efficacy of Neurophroline was evaluated in a double blind test versus placebo under dermatological control. Twenty four volunteers aged 40 to 67 years old took part in the study (average age: 53 ± 2years).

The clinical test was run during summer time, in skin-stressing conditions as the volunteers where living in an geographical area known to have significant atmospheric pollution (measured in ten air quality control stations around the location of the clinical test during the testing period).

The volunteers applied twice a day the placebo or the cream containing Neurophroline at 2% on the most sensitive skin part of their face: under their eyes. The clinical assessment was run for one month.

Pollution by PM10 and ozone was always very close to the recommended limits and exceeded it at some periods. Therefore the stress was very intense during the testing period.

Results: Neurophroline significantly enhances the skin luminosity of volunteers with stressed skin in 2 weeks, with up to +57% improvement in one month.

Neurophroline also shows very rapid results at improving the global skin color around the eye. Skin redness is significantly reduced by 2.4 times after 28 days, and the skin’s color is significantly improved by 99% during the same period of time:

Undereye treatment with best skincare topical for skin luminosity


Get the remarkable benefits of Neurophroline, along with instant plumping, wrinkle blur, 72 hour hydration, and innumerable other benefits of HA7X Multi-Molecular Hydrator Serum.

See its product listing here.

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