Beauty Influencer Evaluates Revivinol "Unretinol" Serum

Before and after photos of alt-Retinol product cheaper bigger better than Biossance Squalane + Phyto-Retinol Serum

Beauty Influencer @bawbby_ reviews new Revivinol Serum, the first dual powerhouse natural alternative to retinol — without the downsides!

“I just finished my 10th use of Revivinol Serum and I couldn’t wait to finally share my thoughts! My main area of concern was this horrible breakout of red bumps I’ve had on my forehead for TWO YEARS. Nothing I tried would fix it, so I covered it with makeup and airbrushing for photos. But after 10 days with this serum, the bumps are GONE and my skin tone has even improved! My entire face looks and feels the best it has in years. I am completely blown away, I thought nothing would ever work for my stubborn skin! I am being 100% honest when I tell you this serum has changed my life. I feel 110% more confident without those unsightly bumps and my red patches.

…this serum is truly amazing and I will continue faithfully using it and recommending it to EVERYONE. Nothing in my life has ever worked as well on my problematic skin as this serum!”

Get Revivinol Serum, a full 2 ounces in size, at a great price here at RevivSerums.com


read more


Why Giving Up Alcohol Could Transform Your Skin

How to reverse the effects of alcohol on skin health

In pursuit of perfect skin, we try countless serums and creams, book elaborate facials, and chug water religiously, yet there’s a beyond-simple fix that has been staring us in the face all this time: giving up (or significantly cutting back on) alcohol—which we’ve long known is no health elixir, but has a perhaps unexpected impact on our complexions, in particular.

“Alcohol is actually one of the worst, most aggressive compounds to destroy your skin,” says New York nutritionist Jairo Rodriguez, who counts designers and Vogue editors among his clients. “I always joke with my patients, ‘If you want to get older, go ahead and drink!’ ” Here, Rodriguez breaks down the exact effects alcohol can have on your skin and how, when you do indulge, to imbibe in the best possible way.

Dehydration Is the Issue . . .
“Drinking is classified as two drinks a day. There’s a huge amount of damage to the skin that occurs; alcohol affects any mucous membrane from the pancreas and liver to the skin. The first effect is dehydration, as it actually takes all the fluid out of the skin. If you look at a woman who has been drinking for 20 or 30 years, and a woman the same age who hasn’t at all, we see a massive difference in the skin—more wrinkles from that dehydration damage, which can make you look 10 years older.”

. . . Inflammation, Too
“Alcohol inflames the tissue, and systemic inflammation to the skin caused by alcohol creates a histamine reaction—that creates the redness, the flushing of the skin. At first you think, oh you’re a little red, not a big deal, but over a period of time—six months, a year, two years—if you continue drinking, it can become a prominent facial redness you can’t get away from.”


You Can Bounce Back—Within Reason

“If you do give it up, the good thing is that your skin, like any other organ, has the ability to regenerate. The body has a fabulous rate of rehydration. But that regeneration depends on how much damage has been done. If you’ve been drinking for 15 to 20 years and stop, I think it’s great, but can you regenerate your skin back to [that of] a normal 50-year-old? Once you destroy the collagen, it is hard to get back.”


Choose Your Liquor Wisely

“People are going to drink, whether you like it or not, so what is the best alcohol to drink? Different alcohols have different effects on the skin, but as a general rule, the clearer, the better: Vodka, gin, and tequila get out of your system quicker. If you’re going to drink anything, in my opinion, drink vodka that doesn’t have a grain in it, like a potato vodka. It’s a lot clearer and smoother, so it gets in and out of your body, no problem.”


Drink Every Other Day—Or Less

“So, when you’re 20 years old and drink, that drink leaves your body in about three hours. When you’re 40 years old, it takes an average of 33 hours. If your transit time is three hours, that means you can drink on Monday and by Tuesday, it’s out of your body. If you’re 40 and you drink on Monday, don’t drink until Wednesday. Minimize to once or twice a week—the lower the intake, the lower the damage to your skin.”


Stay Hydrated

“If you’re going to drink, drink water with it to increase that diuretic effect. I think mothers have been saying that for the last 2,000 years, but nobody listens if your mother says it.”

[Of course, we'd also highly recommend our remarkable TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum with triple telomere targeters as part of the arsenal against alcohol's effect on skin. See its product page here.]

— Excerpted / reprinted from VOGUE: vogue.com/article/alcohol-skin-damage-effects

read more


April is #RosaceaAwareness Month. Knowing what triggers your rosacea and how to prevent flare-ups is key.

Best serums for rosacea

How To Prevent Rosacea Fare-Ups


Several of our remarkable serums work beautifully to help visibly affect the appearance of rosacea.

Our well-rated Copper Healing Serum with copper peptide helps the appearance of redness, irritation, and sebum production.

Top-rated TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum contains a number of ingredients that can assist, especially Renovage, REGU-AGE, and Symsitive 1609.

Further, here are some tips and tricks from the American Academy of Dermatology:


Think sun protection


Just a few minutes of sunlight on rosacea-prone skin can lead to uncontrollable flushing and redness. Dermatologists recommend that everyone who has rosacea:

• Apply a gentle, broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher every day. A fragrance-free sunscreen that contains zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, or both is least likely to irritate your sensitive skin.

Wear a wide-brimmed hat when outdoors during the day.

Stay out of the midday sun.

Seek shade.


Reduce stress

If stress causes your rosacea to flare, you can learn to manage it so that it doesn’t trigger a rosacea flare-up. Here are a few ideas:

Find an activity that relieves your stress and do it often. Common stress busters include tai chi, meditation, or joining a rosacea support group.

Do something that you enjoy on a daily basis.

In a stressful moment, take a deep breath, hold it, and exhale slowly.

Avoid overheating

To avoid a flare-up from heat, dermatologist recommend planning ahead so that you can prevent overheating.

Here are a few things you can do:

Take warm baths and showers rather than hot ones.

Dress in layers, so that you can remove clothing if you start to feel overheated.

Feeling overheated? Drape a cold, wet cloth around your neck. Sip a cold drink.

Keep cool with a fan or air-conditioning.

Sit far enough away from fireplaces, heaters, and other heat sources so that you don’t feel the warmth.


Rethink hot beverages

Studies show that the heat from hot beverages causes some people’s rosacea to flare.

If that sounds like you, making a few changes can help you enjoy beverages that most people drink hot.

Try these ideas:

Drink iced coffee or tea

Let the beverage cool so that it’s warm or lukewarm.


Observe alcohol’s effects

When it comes to flare-ups from alcohol, red wine may be the biggest culprit. You may be able to reduce flares from alcohol if you:

Drink white instead of red wine.

Add soda or lemonade to white wine, beer, and other alcoholic beverages to lessen the amount of alcohol.

Limit yourself to 1 or 2 drinks, and have a large glass of cold water after each drink.
Not drinking alcohol also works.

- See more at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/rosacea/how-to-prevent-rosaces-flare-ups#sthash.QwV9Okrg.dpuf

 

 

read more

Top