All about stress and how it affects your skin

Best skincare product for stressed skin

Stress is a part of life, and stress can affect the health and appearance of skin.


When the body is under stress, it releases cortisol, a regulatory substance transported in tissue fluids to stimulate specific cells or tissues into action.

This effect, over time, can negatively affect the skin in a number of ways.

While managing stress is of utmost important, it’s good to know there is topical help:

HA7X Multi-Molecular Hydrator Serum with Neurophroline™

Neurophroline is the first cosmetic active ingredient shown to address the visible effects of cortisol. It is derived from the wild indigo plant, Tephrosia purpurea, a native Indian plant used in Ayurvedic medicine for its skin benefits. Neurophroline also helps promote the release of endorphins which are relaxing neuropeptides in skin.

Neurophroline is the primary “hero” ingredient in HA7X Serum, which is the first U.S. product to contain this gold-award winning active.

Givaudan Active Beauty, the inventor of Neurophroline, has this to say about this remarkable ingredient:


Neurophroline™: think yourself younger

The revolutionary stress-busting active Neurophroline™, developed by Givaudan can not only combat the signs of environmental aggressors such as pollution and climate, but can also treat the real culprit of ageing – stress. Stress takes its toll on our skin, accelerating ‘wear and tear’ such as circles under the eyes, a fatigued appearance or fine lines. This breakthrough development from Givaudan triggers different actions in our physiological makeup to combat our stress hormones.

Romain, Givaudan’s R&D Director explains how it works: “Being stressed is actually bad for your skin; there are many products for anti-ageing, but none that target stress, despite the fact that this is a key ageing culprit.

“Our new product, Neurophroline™, stimulating the ‘feel good’ beta-endorphins and combating the main stress-hormone, cortisol.” 

He continues: “We can tell whether the product is working by checking that the genes promoting the anti-oxidation are being stimulated. Anti-oxidation is a process that counteracts the negative effect of stress; this is scientifically important because of the link between feeling stressed and ageing skin. This powerful active ingredient generates results in two weeks, especially on high stress areas where the skin is thinnest, e.g. around the eyes."

Romain also gives insights into how feeling less stressed can make us look younger, and why: “Our skin and our brains share the same embryonic origin, meaning that how we feel inside affects how we look outside. If we are stressed, we will look tired, and age faster. If the brain thinks we’re happy and balanced, the skin will react positively… essentially we can think ourselves young again!”

Reverse the visible effects of stress on your skin. Get HA7X here today.

You can also get the remarkable benefits of Neurophroline for your LIPS with RevivLip Lip Renewal Serum System here!

Read more here:

https://www.givaudan.com/fragrances/active-beauty/beauty-breakthroughs-set-to-revolutionise-skin-care

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Beauty & Style blog "That's So Crystal" reviews TelomErase Serum

Highest rated skincare serum for sagging skin

"I don't quite know which of the 10 key ingredients it is that does the job, but whatever it is- it just works. Over the past month I have most definitely noticed a tightening and lifting of my skin that can't be put down to any of the other skincare products that I am using at the moment. My pores have also shrunk noticeably since using this product on a daily basis. My makeup application has also been much improved due to the refined texture and plumpness of my skin. I have also found that when moisturizing after use of the serum, my dry skin seems to absorb my moisturizer better. Again, I don't know why it works and for the sake of being painfully honest, I don't really care. All I care about is that when I stand in front of the mirror and am ready to put on my makeup, I'm actually pleased at what I see staring back at me."

— Beauty and Style Blog "That's So Crystal" on TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum with Triple Telomere Targeters.

Read more here.




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Enzymology: All About Enzymes in Cosmeceuticals

Enzymes in our serums



A number of our serums utilize the remarkable properties of enzymes. Components like Superoxide Dismutase, CoQ10, and Catalase provide great benefits to skin, scalp & hair.

Here are just some of our products with phenomenal enzyme components:

TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum
RevivHair Stimulating Shampoo
RevivLash Lash & Brow Stimulating Serum



All about Enzymes

The purpose of enzymes in a cell is to increase the rate at which reactions occur, to allow the cell to build things or take them apart very quickly. This is because at the temperature and pH level of most cells, chemical reactions such as for cell growth and reproduction do not proceed fast enough to maintain cell viability. Enzymes accelerate the rates of reactions by more than a million-fold, so reactions that would take years can occur in fractions of seconds with the appropriate enzyme.

An enzyme is formed by stringing together 100 to 1,000 amino acids in a specific order. The chain of amino acids then folds into a unique shape. This shape is what allows the enzyme to carry out specific reactions. Enzymes work by a shape recognition; the substrate must form a complex with the enzyme so they can lock together to transfer energy and form a reaction. This reaction is what binds the substrate to the enzyme’s reactive site.
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Enzymology in Cosmetics

The cosmetics industry has been using enzymes such as pumpkin for resurfacing and smoothing skin for many years. Enzymes have also proven useful to treat skin conditions related to skin aging, acne, congestion and pigmentation. Their most common benefits, described in detail below, include free radical scavenging, protein breakdown, structural reinforcement, antibacterial benefits and exfoliation.

While the benefits of enzymes have long been known, interest in enzymology for cosmetic and dermatology applications has more recently grown. This is due in part to advances in optimizing their functionality, safety and stability in cosmetic systems to provide skin and product protection—not to mention their natural and renewable status.

Indeed, coenzymes and cofactors in cosmetics, such as the well-known coenzyme Q10, represent a safe way to promote the efficient functioning of skin’s enzymes. Coenzymes and cofactors generally have low molecular weights, enabling them to penetrate through the stratum corneum to help activate the enzymes that are present. They also are stable and relatively easy to formulate into cosmetics.

Free Radical Scavenging

One area where topical enzymes have shown significant benefits is in skin protection. Enzymes capture free radicals, preventing damage to the skin caused by environmental pollution, bacteria, smoke, sunlight and other harmful factors. In this capacity, enzymes work successfully on the surface of skin, without the need to penetrate deeper to reach living cells.

Perhaps one of the most ubiquitous protective enzymes is superoxide dismutase (SOD). This enzyme, often extracted from yeast, is found in almost all living organisms and works to protect the cells from free radicals in aqueous environments. It also is found in barley grass, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, wheatgrass and most green plants.

SOD, in combination with catalase, is responsible for protecting skin proteins from aging due to oxidation. It works by dismutation, a process by which a highly reactive oxygen free radical is converted to a less reactive form. This is important to aerobic cells. If the oxygen molecule is not completely reduced to two water molecules (by accepting four electrons), the partially reduced superoxide radical will remain and can cause damage to skin.

SOD is used in cosmetics and personal care products as an anti-aging ingredient and antioxidant. It has been shown to prevent wrinkles, fine lines, age spots, help with wound healing, soften scar tissue, protect against UV rays and reduce other signs of aging.

— Excerpted from Cosmetics & Toiletries:
http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/formulating/category/skincare/Enzymology-Accelerating-Success-in-the-Skin-Care-Market-417062653.html


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Research Delves Into Why People Age Differently

Do you look your age? If so or if not, why?

New research from Unilever and Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam is digging into that key question: how do we explain the difference between how old we look and how old we are?

The results, according to the researchers, could "lead to new discoveries to help everybody look younger for longer."

“By learning the ‘secrets’ of those who look young for their age, we can find innovate ways to help everybody keep younger looking for longer in the future," said Unilever senior scientist and study co-leader Dr. David Gunn.

According to an official announcement:

During the project, more than 4,000 people were assessed for their youthful appearance in facial photographs, involving over 100,000 assessments of perceived age (how old they looked). The team then examined more than 8 million variants in the DNA of the participants to investigate whether those who looked young for the age carried different variants to those who looked old for their age.

What the researchers found was that individuals with one form of a gene called MC1R looked two years older than those with a different form.

“Our finding marks another step in understanding aging differences between people and provides new leads to identify the molecular links between perceived age, chronological age, and biological age," said study co-leader Professor Manfred Kayser from Erasmus MC University Medical Centre Rotterdam.

He added, “The next step is to understand on the molecular level why looking younger implies that you are healthier, eventually allowing to comprehend healthy aging.”

- Reprinted/excerpted from GCI Magazine here

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Scientists Find Mitochondrial Complex II Declines with Age

A new study has found the activity of mitochondrial complex II, which is a key metabolic enzyme found in human skin cells, declines as humans age.

These findings, as published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, help scientists at Newcastle University, UK, better understand human skin cells. With this knowledge, the researchers can create potential anti-aging treatments and cosmetic products specialized to work against the decline in the enzyme’s activity levels.

With these results, scientists can develop more treatments for age-related diseases, such as cancer, with the understanding of how other body organs age.

Reflections from the Study’s Leading Professor

The leaders of the study were Mark Birch-Machin, professor of molecular dermatology at Newcastle University and Amy Bowman, Ph.D., research associate at Newcastle University's Institute of Cellular Medicine, along with part of Birch-Machin’s research group. Birch-Machin shared his insights about the research.

"As our bodies age we see that the batteries in our cells run down, known as decreased bio-energy and harmful free radicals increase. This process is easily seen in our skin as increased fine lines, wrinkles and sagging appears.

"Our research means that we now have a specific biomarker, or a target, for developing and screening anti-aging treatments and cosmetic creams that may counter this decline in bio-energy.

"There is now a possibility of finding anti-aging treatments, which can be tailored to differently aged and differently pigmented skin, and with the additional possibility to address the aging process elsewhere in our bodies."

The Research
To determine if there was a difference in activity as age increases, the complex II activity was measured in 27 donors, aged 6 through 72.

Samples were taken from a sun-protected area of skin, and techniques were used to measure the activities of the key enzymes within mitochondria. The mitochondria are involved in producing the skin cell’s energy derived from the epidermis and dermis, or higher and lower levels of skin.

The complex II activity showed cells derived from the lower levels declined with age, per unit of mitochondria. The amount of enzyme protein decreased due to the decline, and the decrease was only examined in the cells that stopped reproducing.

Continuing Studies
Future studies will now have to complete the requirement in setting up techniques to monitor anti-aging approaches in human skin, while also completely understanding skin’s functional consequences and other tissues.

"Newcastle University is pioneering research into aging as it has long been thought that mitochondria play an important role in the aging process, however the exact role has remained unclear,” said Bowman. “Our work brings us one step closer to understanding how these vital cell structures may be contributing to human aging, with the hope of eventually specifically targeting areas of the mitochondria in an attempt to counteract the signs of aging."

A recent study on mice showed the activity of complex II is lower in the skin of naturally aged older mice, in comparison to the skin of younger mice.

- See more at: http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.com/research/biology/Scientists-Find-Mitochondrial-Complex-II-Declines-with-Age-373083051.html

Many of the primary ingredients in our serums target the support of mitochondria. Of special note is the NANO-LIPOBELLE™ DN CoQ10 ingredient in our TelomErase 6-in-1 Multi-Corrective Serum. Here's a study on the positive, supportive effects of this product on mitochondria: http://bit.ly/1LHc70j

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